The making of ...


The melting snow on the roof came about by accident. I ran out of pieces and was waiting, waiting, waiting for a particular order to come in. It took 3 weeks to get the pieces I needed. Meanwhile, I had the base structure of the roof done and some of the white snow in place (perhaps 1/3 up from the bottom). While I waited, it occurred to me that, indeed, it was starting to look like snow melting. With some experimentation and a little rebuilding of the roof, I was able to soften the transition between snow and roof. Had the order come in quickly, I would simply have built up the roof in a night or two and likely not noticed or thought of this effect. Happy accident here.

One of my favorite details is the ice formed under the little snow patches to indicated melted snow later frozen. Flickr is great for studying how things really are and used it in great measure to understand how things should look (rather than how I remember them looking).


The door went together very quickly. It's one of my favorite details and was the fastest to create. My only regret is that it doesn't show up so well in the main image. Oh well.

One of my earlier assembling moments. I really love seeing things under or through other things. There is a certain magic to it. Here, we have rotting, degrading substructure under the shingles (which have fallen off). This is a cause and effect technique which I will be writing about in a later post. I'm a big fan of showing (or implying) before and after in a natural way. It's storytelling, really. It also is engaging – it draws the viewer in to ponder what has happened. Now, this technique is different than showing the action or act. The action is implied (in this case, gradual decay of house through winds and harsh weather).

Here is a detail of the photo just below. Again, I enjoy a thing through a thing technique. You get depth through details in the window. Nothing new here, Lego does this all the time with their sets. 

Ok, a little tip for those starting out or just curious about Lego... When building a house (or any structure for that matter), begin by constructing your walls attached to a base floor. Now, This might seem a bit ... obvious, but for some reason, at the time, it wasn't to me. It took two failed builds of the picture above to realize, yes, walls are best attached to the floor. It sort of, anchors it. :) Being new to this, I didn't know how to attach these kind of angles to the base, so I figured I'd create the walls with hinges and sort it all out later. ....Not a good idea, btw. :D


Broken up steps with snow piles. To the right of the steps you can just make out the gutter which has water frozen in place. This detail was mostly lost in the main image. Again, oh well. 

Again much thanks for enthusiasm all have shared with me! And most of all, much thanks for the blogs and flickr/moc posts that made studying (copying) techniques developed by all kinds of talent possible. 

– mike

16 comments:

Sarah said...

I really would like to try my hand at something like this at some point.How did you go about starting it? How did you buy your pieces? How did you KNOW what pieces to buy for that matter?! Advice for a newbie would be greatly appreciated :)

Catherine said...

I have a question. Are all of the pieces snapped together, or are some of them affixed to the structure in a different way? The picture of the shingles that have fallen onto the lower structure...how did you attach those shingles? Glue? Tape? Or did you manage to snap them in place like a normal lego works?

Mike Doyle said...

Sarah,
Thanks for complement! I'm still a newbie too but I'd be happy to share what I've found out. My next blog will be a primer of what I have found for reference. Thanks for the suggestion!

Mike Doyle said...

Catherine,
No foreign materials were used in this model; it's pure Lego. There are some pieces made with 'studs' (the bump that snaps things together) on the side as well as top for situations just like this. One such that I used is called a headlight. It's a 1 x 1 brick with the stud on one side so you can snap stuff to sides as you see here.

chris rankin said...

Awesome Mike. Love the creativity.

Mark Stafford said...

This is a really superb building, you've managed to make something astounding almost at your first attempt. I'm looking forward to seeing what you do next.

Miss Organizized said...

I just stumbled on this blog...absolutely incredible Mike! My boyfriend takes photos of old decrepit houses like this and to see that translated through legos WITH snow and ice? I'm in awe!!!!

simonvx said...

Oustanding. I'll keep an eye on your blog, that's for sure (and I'm selective)

Daniel said...

Jesus, man... that's amazing. Brilliant job there.

Claus said...

Most awsome!

http://jandf-world.minifig.dk

Oddbastard said...

fantastico lavoro!!

redhead1982 said...

Mike, I think this is a fantastic creation. I was mostly amazed by the simplicity of the colours (or non-colours) black and white. It is so pure and siple, yet very complexed. Congratulations on this!

oesoy said...

is this for sale?

Mike Doyle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Destination:Boss said...

That's absolutely fantastic, I couldn't believe my eyes when I first looked at them. Imagine trying to solve that one when you were a kid!

Mike Doyle said...

oesoy,
No sorry, I actually have dismantled it. Need the pieces. However, I will be selling limited signed & number digital prints.

I'll be selling these through:
www.bumbleandbramble.blogspot.com